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Is Belly Dance Sexy?

How to Embrace Sensuality When Words are Traps

Belly Dancer Belly“Now, stand with your pelvis in neutral, feet hip width apart, and knees bent” I told my class of Advanced Beginner students as I showed them a Figure 8. “Don’t do this,” I added, taking my legs wider apart and tilting my pelvis forward. “That’s okay for the club, but it’s not okay here.” As usual my students giggled at my exaggerated impersonation of an ‘impolite’ belly dancer.

Then one of my students asked shyly, as if she was anticipating my disappointment, “But… I don’t understand. Belly dance is sexy, isn’t it? Why do we have to try so hard not to be sexy?”

She didn’t mean it as a challenge. She was simply puzzled by a complicated issue I had often struggled with myself, one that has shadowed our art ever since it was brought to the Western world. Where does sexy belong in belly dance? And what are we to do with it?

A Belly Dancer Named Goldilocks

It’s always a harrowing walk along the edge of the knife for belly dancing professionals. We have to make our living, which means promoting ourselves and advertising our services to a general public that often is very misinformed about what we actually do. It can be difficult finding a common language that sells our classes and shows, but that still maintains an authentic connection to the art. If you lean too far one way, you’ll alienate potential students and customers who may not yet understand or appreciate authentic Middle Eastern culture. Lean too far the other way and… well, you know what kind of names are waiting for those belly dancers.

I don’t know about you, but I feel constantly burdened by the tension that exists between these two extremes. I’m always at the ready to defend my art, ever-anticipating a need to justify who I am and what I do. When I tell people I’m a belly dancer, I’ve come to expect that it will somehow give them permission to ask me personal questions they’d never ask another stranger, or even a close friend. I sometimes assume dancers of other mainstream and Western styles will be prejudiced against me. I often attribute rejections to be included in community events and exclusions from teaching at certain studios to be a judgement of me or my trade.

As I drove home that evening after class, I couldn’t help but think that I had, in some ways, failed in my duties as an instructor. In their studies I had encouraged my students to find the beauty and power, to respect the level of dexterity that it demanded, and to show them expressions of joy, humor, and even tragedy. But in my battle-ready preparedness to defend my art I had not encouraged them to embrace their sensuality. It wasn’t that I thought belly dance shouldn’t be sexy, it was that I assumed they already had connected the two. Or rather, I assumed what they knew about sex and belly dance was overdeveloped and that I, at the least, had to show them other dimensions of the dance, if not tone down the perception that already existed. I was coming to realize, however, that it wasn’t just that Americans tended to oversex belly dance, it was that their idea of sexiness was very different than the sensuality in belly dance. In other words, it wasn’t just the volume, it was the melody of the music, too.

An Ill-Advised Search

In the coming months I thought a lot about sexuality, sensuality, and belly dance. I even did a few searches on Google (I wouldn’t try it unless you are prepared!) to see what happened when I put the terms “sex” and “belly dance” together. In the top ten results there were a few links I didn’t dare click. In others, a teenage boy asked on Yahoo Answers if belly dancers made the best sex partners, to which the replies, also from other young men, unanimously agreed that they were. The experience was so sensationally crazy, one suggested, as to break his equipment. There was also a blog article from a feminist author that questioned whether or not belly dance supported or contradicted stereotypical roles for women, a tutorial “How to Belly Dance Your Way to Better Sex,” and in a forum where, again, the experience of having sex with a belly dancer was being discussed, a woman claiming she was just beginning to take belly dance classes joined the conversation and promised “to use [her] powers for good and not evil. ::wink::”.

It’s particularly frustrating to read these discussions when you think about how many double standards exist. Certainly, more skin is shown in professional ice skating (when there’s even more reason to bundle up!), and yet the sport is an esteemed tradition in Olympic competitions. There’s actual physical contact between partners in ballroom dancing but, at least in this day and age, the waltz wouldn’t be excluded from any wholesome community event. Other exercises that improve physical health, even some that probably do much more for improving sexual health like Yoga, are celebrated by doctors, physical therapists, and psychologists. I’m not going to discuss how and why these double standards came to exist (because there’s already great articles about that), but I think it’s important to acknowledge how challenging they can be.

*I happen to love ice skating, ballroom dancing, and yoga, so I am by no means suggesting that these are not legitimate pursuits. In fact, all of them are great for physical conditioning, and all are beautiful art forms, too.

It’s a Trap!

Why are these perceptions so damaging? Certainly most belly dancers would prefer not to be treated like strippers or prostitutes. But the real dangers, in my opinion, are in the limitations it imposes. In American culture being sexy is a trap. It’s a characteristic of the “other” entertainment, the kind that didn’t get to your television or to the stage by the merits of requiring dedication, talent, creativity, or vision. When entertainment is defined exclusively by its sexiness, it’s value is judged by the physical attributes of the performers, not by their skills.

This means that:

  • To be a good belly dancer, you should fit the American stereotype of an attractive woman. You should be thin, toned, and young. You should have flawless skin, thick shiny hair, and… well, you know. Go open a magazine.
  • The art of the dance goes unnoticed. The preparation and work given to each performance is overlooked. Your technique, your creativity of interpretation, your strength and poise, are relatively meaningless.
  • You’re limited in your expressions. You can be sexy, but you can’t use the dance to celebrate a joyful moment, interpret the loss of a loved one, show triumph over a challenging obstacle, connect to a higher being, share in a sisterhood, or anything else. Even sexy is limited to the American interpretation of being very loud, aggressive, and accessible.

It’s therefore easy to see why ‘polite’ belly dancers shy away from the label of “sexy”. It’s a dangerous one.

But Belly Dance Is Sexy, Isn’t It?

Yes, it can be! But it can be sexy in a way that embraces womanhood in all stages of life, no matter who she is or what she looks like. It can be sexy in the way she dances, the dedicated practice, the creative vision, and the energy that is invested, not what her body looks like through the performance. It can be sexy, but through an entire range of feminine expressions from cheerful celebrations to quiet lamentations, moments of hopelessness to surges of triumph, it can be many other things, too.

To my students: I encourage you to embrace sensuality in your dance, because it is a natural part of the human experience. But I ask that you first examine, and expanded upon, your previous conceptions of sexuality. Be wary of the limitations that “sexy” imposes. Continue to learn about and advocate for belly dance as an art. You have a responsibility to represent it as such to the greater community.

To other professionals: I encourage you to have a “birds and the bees” talk with your students. Let them discuss their ideas about what sexiness means to them and how it relates to belly dance in an environment that is supportive and judgement free. Remember that you’re not just turning down the volume, as I did for years, but also trying to change the melody. Sensuality in belly dance is not always bad.

What do you think?

Does sexy have a place in belly dance? How do you manage perceptions? Please leave your thoughts in the comments below!


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Categories
Branding and Professional Image

Choosing a Stage Name in the Digital Era

A dancer's stage name online

We live in an era where nearly everyone has a social online identity and it’s difficult to separate one’s personal from professional life. It used to be easy to step out on stage under whatever name you pleased only to leave behind the oriental fantasy at the end of the night. Now there will always be Facebook photos and YouTube videos to connect her to you; the digital world is an unmasker of secret identities.

So how does a dancer identify herself in the digital age? There is already great advice available about choosing a stage name. I’m not going to readdress what’s already been thoroughly discussed in such thoughtful detail by others. If you’d like more information about where to find or how to pick a name you should read Do You Need a Stage Name? by Shira, or How to Choose Your Stage Name by Taaj. What I would like to present, however, are some considerations for dancers who are thinking about going pro and would need their name to serve them as a brand.

A few assumptions

If you’re a belly dancer that plans to one day teach or perform professionally you’re going to need an online presence. Yes, I said it. An online presence is a necessity for professionals. It may just be a website, but more than likely you’ll also have an online social presence like a Facebook page, a Twitter feed, a blog, or a YouTube channel, as well. This is what makes choosing a stage name in the digital era different. We now have to consider how that name will fit within a global network.

I’m also going to assume that the digital age has brought changes that are neither good or bad- just different. A lot of people are quick to criticize or praise the use of social media. Let’s just assume for now that, whether we like it or not, it’s part of our brand. Our job as professionals (or as up and coming professionals) is to learn about the market so that we can make the best decisions.

Is choosing a stage name going out of style?

As Ava Fleming, Michelle Joyce, and Rachel Brice might tell you, it certainly is becoming more common for dancers to perform under their legal name. I think this is a result of the evolution of the dance in this country, as well as the evolution of its perception by the general public. However within more traditional styles, especially when the dancer may be working with an ethnic audience, choosing a stage name is still common.

Do you really need a stage name?

Creating an alternate dance persona can be fun. It can give you courage when you first start to perform. It may help you create a sense of mystique or authenticity for the audience. It can also help protect your identity if you really really need to separate the dancing from your personal life. These are still good reasons to choose a dance name, but I also think they are becoming less important and less relevant.

I think there is something very powerful about a dancer who is bold enough to step on stage as herself. It has also been my experience in the six years I have been Ananke that the pseudonym has become less enticing and more off-putting for potential clients and students. They seem more uncomfortable calling me by my stage name when they have the choice of my legal name.

If I were making the decision today? Hmm… I might not be Ananke.

Tips for choosing a stage name in the digital era

  1. Make sure the name is unique. This is where having the internet really comes in handy! Do a thorough search on Google, Wikipedia, Facebook, and YouTube to make sure that there aren’t any other dancers, troupes, or businesses with that name. Adjust the spelling and add a last name if needed to make it totally yours. I strongly urge you to avoid common names, such as Nadirah or Scherezade, even if you have a unique spelling and last name.
  2. Try the name out first. Perform a few times in a casual setting with the name you’re thinking about using. It may look great on paper or in your head, but it might not feel right when you’re dancing or when the announcer introduces you. Ask people at the show for their opinion. What did your name make them think of when they saw it in the program? Did it fit the dancer who came out on stage? Trying out a name at a show is a great way to test the market’s reaction.
  3. Have a two part name ready. Maybe you’ve already chosen a first and last name for the stage. Even if you’re going to go the single name route, have a second word prepared for online social profiles. Often when you sign up for an account on a website or online directory they’ll require you to enter a first AND last name. I always sign up as “Ananke Dance”. It’s easy just to add ‘dance’ or ‘dances’ after your stage name to complete the profile. The goal here is just to be consistent, so that if someone is interested and searches for ‘Ananke Dance’ they’ll be able to find your other profiles.
  4. Reserve the name for yourself. You might not be ready to go professional at this point, but when you do you’ll want to own your stage name on major sites like Facebook, Twitter, or YouTube. My favorite place to go is Knowem.com where you can check the availability of your name across hundreds of social networks. Register on the networks that are most important to you, or find new networks you may want to add to your existing online network.
  5. Decide how you want to separate your personal and professional life. It’s important to start thinking early about where you will use a dance name versus your personal identity. You may choose to use a website only as your dance persona, have separate accounts for your personal and for your dance persona, or divide them in some other way. For example, I have a personal Facebook profile but a Facebook page for dance. I only have one Twitter account, but it’s for my dance persona only. I have two Pinterest accounts, one to serve me personally and another to serve me professionally. Decide where it’s important to make these divisions (and how many times you want to login and out everyday).

Questions, thoughts, reactions?

What else would you consider when deciding upon a stage name? Does it still make sense to choose a name in this day and age? Why or why not?

 

Categories
Branding and Professional Image Most Popular

Mind Your Manners! Hafla Etiquette for Bellydancers

Ananke performing at hafla

Update for the Non- Dancer Audience: Just remember that attending a belly dance show is about having a good time! You probably have already attended a ballet or other performing arts event. It’s really not much different.

What do you do when a belly dancer approaches your table? Feel free to encourage the dancer with smiles, eye contact (for however long seems natural to you), and by clapping along to the music. It’s okay to watch her body movements or her use of any props, too. And don’t forget that you can always talk to her, even if it’s just to tell her she’s doing a great job! If you’re uncomfortable- go back to your dinner conversation. It’s that simple.

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It’s spring, which means it’s hafla season. If you’re into performing you probably have at least one upcoming show in the next few weeks. And even if you’re not performing I bet you’ll be attending one soon. So I thought it would be a good time to review the P’s and Q’s of performance etiquette.

Why it’s important. Being polite and respectful at shows is about maintaining your reputation amongst your fans and your fellow dancers. Your name is the single most important thing you have. If you tarnish it, then you don’t dance. It doesn’t matter how good your technique is. It’s that simple.

So what is good show etiquette for bellydancers? I’ve broken it down into three categories:

In the Audience

  • Be positive. You know Thumper’s Law: if you can’t say something nice, don’t say nothin’ at all. Help create a show atmosphere where women are supported for being who they are, where they are in their study of the dance. Plus, you never know who might overhear your negative comments.
  • Be supportive. Don’t underestimate the power of a reassuring smile, especially for dancers new to the stage. Clap along to the music, or zaghareet where appropriate. If you’re comfortable with a little Arabic, you can also call out encouraging phrases such as “Yalla!” or “Ya Habibi!” Be careful with hissing- while it may be appropriate in some tribal dance themed shows, cabaret or folkloric dancers will probably find it offensive.
  • Buy something. If the hafla is being held in a restaurant or lounge, you should at least buy a drink to support the establishment. The tables are there for paying customers, and your ticket or cover charge doesn’t count. This is just as true for dancers in the show who are sitting in the audience before or after their number!
  • Stay for the whole thing. Don’t just arrive for your number and then leave after your done. Be there to support all the dancers. If you really must leave for another engagement, then email the event organizer to let them know well ahead of time.
  • Wear your cover-up. For performers not on stage, and this includes any time you’re sitting in the audience, you should wear an appropriate cover-up. A transparent veil isn’t enough; aim for a caftan or change of clothes instead. You don’t want your costume to detract from the performance currently onstage. And if you haven’t performed yet, you don’t want to give away your look!
  • Promote where appropriate. Haflas often have a table with promotional materials such as flyers and business cards made available to the audience. Before placing your own materials here, check with the event organizer.

In the Dressing Room

  • Be on time. This helps the event organizers run the show smoothly. It also gives you more time to prepare backstage. Be sure to check in with the stage manager and to hand off your music, stage introduction, etc. to the DJ or emcee as soon as you arrive.
  • Come prepared. You should arrive in full costume and makeup with only some last minute pinning and adjustments needed. Triple check that you have everything you need before you leave. Have your dancer emergency kit (extra safety pins, costume tape, needle and thread, bobby pins, etc.) with you. Remember: “A lack of planning on my part does not constitute an emergency on someone else’s part.”
  • Don’t hog the dressing room. It’s rare to be in a dressing room that isn’t overcrowded. Do what you can to maximize the space by bringing in only what you must. Try to give everyone some mirror time, especially the dancers going on stage before you. And please please please don’t practice your routine in the dressing room.
  • Stay positive.  It’s good to remember that everyone prepares for a show differently. Some people might want to chit chat to ease their nerves, others may want time alone to recenter. Stay positive and cheerful. The “OMG I’m going to mess up!” neediness is draining for everyone. You’re already here. Take a breath. Have fun.
  • Offer some help. Other dancers may need assistance with zipping, pinning, clasping, etc. Lend a hand if you have a spare moment, especially if you’re already done with your performance.
  • Mind the door. Some dressing rooms open into an area that is public. Check to make sure that you won’t expose any dancers before exiting. Knock before entering if necessary.
  • Don’t bring anyone else. Your friend/significant other/children should not come with you to the dressing room. If you need support or assistance, ask another dancer. If you need a babysitter, hire one to stay with your kids in the audience!

On Stage

  • Shh! Be quiet. While waiting in the wings try not to make any noise or ruffle the curtains. This includes talking, zilling, jingling, etc.
  • Stick to time limits. Let me tell you a little secret. I’ve never seen someone dance over their time limit and be glad they made the decision. Sticking to your time limit is respectful to the event organizers and your fellow dancers. Also, the best performances leave the audience wanting more. It’s hard to go wrong leaving too soon.
  • Give credit. In your stage introduction (or emcee notes) you should acknowledge anyone that assisted you with the choreography or the routine. Giving credit also means acknowledging the musicians if dancing to live music, and acknowledging the audience with a bow or curtsey.
  • Have a prop retrieval plan. A lot of event organizers would prefer you to leave the stage with whatever props you had when you entered. Even if this is not the case, make sure someone will be there to collect your things before the next performance.
  • Entrance and exit (have them). Be in character before the audience can see you, and keep it until after you are well out of sight. Nothing ruins the moment like an artist getting into character on stage.

The Good, the Bad, the Ugly

Do you have an example of really great show etiquette? How about a horror story? Please post in the comments below or share it on the Facebook page.

Categories
Technique, Practice, & Performance

6 Tips for Selecting the Right Music for Your Next Performance

Choosing Belly Dance Performance Music

It all starts with music. It’s the foundation of your dance. You can have great technique and stage charisma, but if you’re not connecting to the music then you’re not connecting to the audience.

The best performances are the ones that blend all elements together seamlessly- the music complements the choice of movements, the costuming, the venue, and the dancer’s expression. Here are six tips for selecting and interpreting your next musical piece:

Selection

  • Pick a song that inspires you. Songs that naturally move you will be easier to choreograph and more enjoyable to watch in performance.
  • Give a thought to the venue. Where do you see yourself performing this routine? The musical style should fit the theme or demands of the show for which you are preparing. A non-traditional or fusion piece should only be performed at fusion-friendly events. Traditional music is appropriate at most shows, restaurants, and private gigs.
  • Avoid music that is too long or complicated. Basically, this boils down to owning the routine and dancing within your limits. You want to leave the audience wanting more. Beginners should stick to songs that are three to five minutes in length, with simple rhythms and a single mood or theme. You can begin to add in complexity as you advance in your studies. (This doesn’t mean beginner dancers can’t dance to more complicated music- it’s just not the best selection for a performance).

Interpretation

  • Know the meaning of the lyrics. This may be useful in helping you understand the emotions of the piece. And you also generally want to avoid music with religious, political, or other controversial themes. Try searching for a translation online.
  • Listen to the music, a lot! Learn all its pieces and how they fit together- the accents, crescendos, and pauses. It may sound tedious, but interpreting music is like developing a relationship with a person. There will be elements that grab your attention and excite you when you first hear the song, but your understanding will be deeper and more complex when you have gotten to know it well.
  • Break it down into recognizable segments. There should be repetition in your music- a chorus, a melody, a drum section. Find these patterns and map the overall structure. It’s important because your dancing should acknowledge repetitions in the music. Your movements, combinations, and patterns should repeat, at least in part, with the music.

Question for you: How do you know when you’ve found the right song?

Categories
Health & Wellbeing Most Popular

The Belly Dance Weight Loss Myths

Does Bellydancing Really Help you Lose Weight?

I hear this question all the time:

“So will belly dance make me lose weight?”

It’s a complicated response, the answer is both yes and no.

Unfortunately, I think a lot of women are drawn to the dance by the weight loss marketing schemes adopted by many popular DVDs. The message is this: Shapely women with all the right curves belly dancing… buy this and join their ranks! So how come dancing to the video twice a week hasn’t made you lose weight? No wonder so many come to the conclusion “belly dance for weight loss just doesn’t work”.

But it does.

Belly dance is cardio and gentle strength training exercise. If you want to lose weight belly dancing, you’ll need to treat it like a proper workout regiment.

How to Belly Dance to Lose Weight:

  • Practice for at least three hours a week (that’s six half hour sessions, if you like!). The average woman will burn approximately 300 calories per hour, so this will add up to about 900 calories for the week or about 1/4 pound.
  • Make a playlist of your favorite dancing tunes. Hit play, start dancing, and don’t stop until your time is up. In a workout, you’re not necessarily practicing your technique in front of the mirror. The goal is to keep moving!
  • Traveling steps and layering your movements will burn more calories.
  • Don’t forget to use your arms! Keeping them up and switching positions means a better workout. For extra resistance, add a veil or heavy pair of finger cymbals.
  • Try a belly dance fitness or aerobics class. These are usually geared towards getting students to move and use large muscle groups. Technique classes often have a lot of down time.
  • Can you belly dance and do chores around the house? Hey if you have to vacuum, do dishes, or dust, why not add a shimmy to these activities? Workout + housework = more time to soak in the tub afterwards!
  • Try to reduce your calorie intake by about 300 calories per day. Make yourself aware of the serving sizes on the back of the packaging. Keep a food journal to keep track of your intake if necessary.
  • Supplement your belly dance workout with other exercise training. Light strength training with weights and yoga are great compliments.

What You Can Expect:

  • With a calorie reduction and regular practice, about one to two pounds of weight loss a week. Remember that weight loss over two pounds a week is not recommended by doctors.
  • Some toning in the abs, arms, and glutes, as these are the muscles used to produce the movements. Additional strength training, however, is needed to produce significant results. Belly dance is more effective as a cardio (think lose fat) rather than strength training (think tone muscles) exercise.
  • Better posture, coordination, and flexibility.

Including belly dance in your weight loss routine is a great choice. It’s fun and exciting, and can make sticking to a workout much easier. Remember that regular practice is necessary, and that the most effective plans will incorporate diet and other forms of exercise.

Some Related Myths:

  • Bellydance does NOT make your stomach stick out or make you gain weight.
  • You do NOT have to be thin, or young, or curvy, or (fill in your body image issue here) to belly dance. Women of all shapes and sizes can and do participate professionally.

What do you think? Has belly dancing helped you lose weight? Do you have some tips of your own? Please comment below!

stock photo